myvoicemyright:

Syrians walk by a destroyed building in the Bustan al-Qasr neighbourhood of Aleppo. The graffiti reads: ‘Our revolution will continue despite destruction.’ (/Ahmed Deeb/Al Jazeera )
 

myvoicemyright:

Syrians walk by a destroyed building in the Bustan al-Qasr neighbourhood of Aleppo. The graffiti reads: ‘Our revolution will continue despite destruction.’ (/Ahmed Deeb/Al Jazeera )

 

  • * Justin bieber doing drugs *
  • White people : you know , he is growing up , he is under too much pressure
  • *Lady Gaga insulting Muslim women in the world by Burqa *
  • White people : oh , come on , she is not , she is liberating them , by dancing naked and sexualizing this outfit .
  • *Miley Cyrus twerking *
  • White people : SO PROUD OF YOU , YOU ARE A TRUE FEMINIST AND YOU ARE SHOWING PEOPLE THE BLACK CULTURE , SO AMAZING , WOW
  • * A white person kills innocent people*
  • White people : NO , HOW DARE YOU , HE HAS A MENTAL DISORDER , DID YOU KNOW THAT HE WAS BULLIED AND LIKE HE CARED ABOUT ANIMALS
  • * Blurred Lines *
  • White people : THAT'S A GREAT VIDEO , IT's A FORM OF FEMINISM
  • * POC does drugs *
  • White people : OMG , THEY ARE ALL LIKE THAT , THOSE PEOPLE ARE RUINING THE WORLD , I AM NOT BEING RACIST , THEY ARE THE CAUSE OF ALL TROUBLE , OMG , I CAN'T DEAL WITH THESE UNCIVILIZED PEOPLE
  • * POC kills someone *
  • White people : OH LORD , THESE PEOPLE ARE TERRORISTS AND CRIMINALS , THEY HATE US ,THEY WANT TO KILL US , WE NEED TO TAKE GUNS FROM THEM , PUT THEM IN Jail , torture them in Guantanamo
  • * A black girl twerks *
  • White people : YOU KNOW WHAT , , THAT'S SO DISGUSTING , THAT'S WHAT THEY DO ALL DAY KILLING EACH OTHER AND TWERKING , I CAN'T , THIS IS TOO MUCH FOR MY WHITENESS TO HANDLE
  • * A Rap song *
  • White people : SHAME ON YOU , YOU ARE USING THESE POOR LITTLE GIRLS AND WANTING THEM TO DO SEXUAL THINGS , WE NEED TO PUT ALL OF YOU IN JAIL
thepoeticpalestinian:

Names of Gaza’s martyrs from Israel’s 2014 offensive. Note that these are just the children. May the rest in peace.

thepoeticpalestinian:

Names of Gaza’s martyrs from Israel’s 2014 offensive. Note that these are just the children. May the rest in peace.

Guess what another Eid Selfie …

Guess what another Eid Selfie …

(Source: myvoicemyright)

myvoicemyright:

image

JUST 

image

WOKE UP 

image

TO

image

THESE 

image

AND RIGHT NOW I DON’T KNOW HOW TO REACT , I AM SERIOUSLY GOING TO CRY , I AM SPEECHLESS , IT IS JUST SO PERFECT , SO WELL WRITTEN , YOU GET ME SO MUCH AND I FEEL THE LOVE

YOU ARE AMAZING FOR DOING THIS AND I WISH IT WAS OFF ANON SO I COULD HUG YOU AND KISS YOU AND STALK YOU AND MAYBE EVEN MARRY YOU

I LOVE YOU

I LOVE YOU 

I LOVE YOU 

I LOVE YOUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU

THANK YOU SO MUCHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH 

*HUGS AND KISSES*

I am still not  over this yet :’) 

myvoicemyright:

not in the mood to blog , ugh , maybe I will start the hiatus from today instead of tomorrow 

maybe just one more day 

not in the mood to blog , ugh , maybe I will start the hiatus from today instead of tomorrow 

adultnapped:

isn’t it creepy that from the day you are born you start to die

 

nowinexile:


John Legend ladies and gentlemen. 

nowinexile:

John Legend ladies and gentlemen. 

visualechoess:

Dubai II by: M KHALIL

visualechoess:

Dubai II by: 

myvoicemyright:

Kids celebrate EID in Gaza even though the war is not over yet *

Jul. 29, 1910: Slocum Massacre in Texas

atane:

On July 29, 1910, citizens in the small, predominately African American town of Slocum, Texas were massacred.

That morning, hundreds of white citizens from the surrounding community converged on Slocum. Over the following days terror reigned for the African American citizens as individuals were gunned down working fields and seeking shelter in their homes.

Even those who tried to leave town were not safe. Many bodies were found shot in the woods, with their travel packs at their sides. While there has never been a clear figure of how many died, estimates range from 8 to 25. Many suspect the toll was much higher.

This was one of many towns, such as Rosewood and Tulsa, where a successful, self-sufficient African American community was the subject of a terrorist attack designed to maintain economic white supremacy.

H/T

scinerds:


Earth May Be in Early Days of 6th Mass Extinction

Earth may be in the early stages of a sixth mass extinction, an international team of scientists says.
Image: Neil deGrasse Tyson walks over to ‘The Halls of Extinction’ - Cosmos: A Space time Odyssey
Animals and plants are threatened. More than 320 land vertebrates have gone extinct since 1500, the researchers said. The world’s remaining animals with backbones are 25 percent less abundant than in 1500— a trend also seen in invertebrate animals, such as crustaceans, worms and butterflies, the scientists reported.
The previous mass extinction, which wiped out the dinosaurs, happened about 65 million years ago, likely from a catastrophic asteroid that collided with Earth. In contrast, the looming sixth mass extinction is linked to human activity, Rodolfo Dirzo, a professor of biology at Stanford University in California, said in a statement. Dirzo is the lead author of the new review of past research on the topic, which suggests Earth is in the early days of this sixth mass extinction.
A past study, which involved data from the fossil record and modern-day conservation biology, suggested Earth could enter such a mass extinction within the next 300 to 2,000 years. That study was detailed in the March 2, 2011, issue of the journal Nature.
Up to one-third of all vertebrates are threatened or endangered, the researchers said. Large animals — such as elephants, rhinoceroses and polar bears — have the highest rates of decline, which is a trend shared by other mass extinctions. These large animals are at particular risk because they tend to have few offspring and low population growth rates. Hunters and poachers, however, find their fur, meat, tusks or horns attractive targets.
 Losing a species of large animal can have unexpected effects on the ecosystem and nearby human developments, a process known as defaunation. In one study, researchers isolated patches of land from animals, including zebra, giraffes and elephants. Without the animals, the grass and shrubs grew tall, and the soil became looser. Rodents quickly took over and doubled in numbers, eating the seeds from the plants and living in the patchy soil that was relatively predator-free.
Rodents can carry diseases and parasites that infect people, the researchers said.
"Where human density is high, you get high rates of defaunation, high incidence of rodents and thus high levels of pathogens, which increases the risks of disease transmission," Dirzo said. "Who would have thought that just defaunation would have all these dramatic consequences? But it can be a vicious circle."
The decline of big animals affects not only vegetation, but also invertebrates. In the past 50 years, the human population has doubled, and the number of invertebrate animals has dropped by 45 percent, the researchers said. Much of the loss is a result of habitat destruction and global climate disruption, the researchers said.

scinerds:

Earth May Be in Early Days of 6th Mass Extinction

Earth may be in the early stages of a sixth mass extinction, an international team of scientists says.

Image: Neil deGrasse Tyson walks over to ‘The Halls of Extinction’ - Cosmos: A Space time Odyssey

Animals and plants are threatened. More than 320 land vertebrates have gone extinct since 1500, the researchers said. The world’s remaining animals with backbones are 25 percent less abundant than in 1500— a trend also seen in invertebrate animals, such as crustaceans, worms and butterflies, the scientists reported.

The previous mass extinction, which wiped out the dinosaurs, happened about 65 million years ago, likely from a catastrophic asteroid that collided with Earth. In contrast, the looming sixth mass extinction is linked to human activity, Rodolfo Dirzo, a professor of biology at Stanford University in California, said in a statement. Dirzo is the lead author of the new review of past research on the topic, which suggests Earth is in the early days of this sixth mass extinction.

A past study, which involved data from the fossil record and modern-day conservation biology, suggested Earth could enter such a mass extinction within the next 300 to 2,000 years. That study was detailed in the March 2, 2011, issue of the journal Nature.

Up to one-third of all vertebrates are threatened or endangered, the researchers said. Large animals — such as elephants, rhinoceroses and polar bears — have the highest rates of decline, which is a trend shared by other mass extinctions. These large animals are at particular risk because they tend to have few offspring and low population growth rates. Hunters and poachers, however, find their fur, meat, tusks or horns attractive targets.

Losing a species of large animal can have unexpected effects on the ecosystem and nearby human developments, a process known as defaunation. In one study, researchers isolated patches of land from animals, including zebra, giraffes and elephants. Without the animals, the grass and shrubs grew tall, and the soil became looser. Rodents quickly took over and doubled in numbers, eating the seeds from the plants and living in the patchy soil that was relatively predator-free.

Rodents can carry diseases and parasites that infect people, the researchers said.

"Where human density is high, you get high rates of defaunation, high incidence of rodents and thus high levels of pathogens, which increases the risks of disease transmission," Dirzo said. "Who would have thought that just defaunation would have all these dramatic consequences? But it can be a vicious circle."

The decline of big animals affects not only vegetation, but also invertebrates. In the past 50 years, the human population has doubled, and the number of invertebrate animals has dropped by 45 percent, the researchers said. Much of the loss is a result of habitat destruction and global climate disruption, the researchers said.